Teenage Engineering TX-6 mixer review

Teenage Engineering TX-6 mixer: What is it?

Teenage Engineering has long been known for its bold choices. For better and worse, one of the more eyebrow-raising aspects of its output tends to be the price point of their products, ranging from the satisfyingly cheap Pocket Operators to the latest iteration of the OP-1, which has jumped from the original’s £799 to an eye-watering £2k.

The portable, rechargeable TX-6 mixer sits alongside that latest OP-1, being the first two products in TE’s new ‘Field’ range, so it’s perhaps unsurprising that it lands at an equally high-end price point of £1200. At first glance, that sort of price tag appears downright alarming for a piece of music-making hardware that is small enough to fit into the palm of your hand, especially considering that compact mixers over £200 are generally seen as top-end. There is, however, considerably more to the TX-6 than meets the eye and there is some justification for why it costs so much.

Teenage Engineering TX-6 mixer

(Image credit: Future)

For one thing, it looks and feels great; the unit itself is sleek and incredibly rugged, with components that respond smoothly under the fingers without feeling either delicate or too stiff. From the moment of unboxing it’s obvious that the TX-6 is – in terms of its build quality – a seriously high-quality bit of kit.

Teenage Engineering TX-6 mixer

(Image credit: Future)

The TX-6 can function in a variety of ways too, making it far more flexible than a straightforward 6-channel mixer. On the mixer front, the TX-6’s six inputs – all line level – are each stereo and can be used in mono, stereo or split modes, the latter allowing two mono inputs to be summed to each channel. There are three analogue outputs: a quarter-inch main out, plus mini-jack cue and auxiliary outputs that can be used for headphones, creating an effect loop or even hooking up a headset mic. What’s more, there’s a USB connection that allows the TX-6 to act as an audio interface with up to 12 inputs or 12 outputs (although not at the same time, and currently not for Windows). It can act as a Bluetooth MIDI interface too, both sending and receiving MIDI data, allowing it to act as an adapter or handy little controller.

Teenage Engineering TX-6 mixer

(Image credit: Future)

Teenage Engineering TX-6 mixer: Performance and verdict